Preventing Prescription Medication Errors

In a medication error report that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published last Fall, it estimated that over a million US citizens are injured each year from various medication errors and that one person dies each day from a medication error.

A medication error can occur at any place along the prescription drug distribution system—from prescribing errors by physicians, repackaging and dispensing errors by a pharmacy, or administering and monitoring errors by the patient or the patient’s caregiver.

A John Hopkins study earlier last year suggested that the problem might be even more extensive than the FDA report. The results of that study indicated that medication errors of all kinds are under-recognized and that 10% of all deaths in the US are due to medication errors. That translates to approximately 250,000 deaths per year and it elevates “Medication Error-Related Deaths” to the third leading cause of death in the US.

What lead me to search out these statistics was a recent article my wife pointed out that was recently published in the New York Times online publication. The article spoke of a patient who was prescribed an anti-heartburn medication by his doctor for acid reflux from a hiatal hernia. When he picked up his medication, however, he was given a drug to treat a yeast infection—a medication that can cause gastric upset and additional acid reflux.

Since it was the first time the patient had been prescribed this medication, he was not aware of the drug mix-up and did not question what medication he took home from the pharmacy until he started taking it and his heartburn increased dramatically—to the point that he began to think “ulcer” or “heart attack.”

There is an interesting twist to this story, a combination of errors if you will, that particularly fascinated me. When the man questioned whether the medication was helping or hurting because he was feeling so bad, he looked closer at what he had brought home from the pharmacy.

He checked the bag that contained the prescription bottle and it was properly labeled with his name and the correct drug; but, when he looked closer at the prescription bottle itself, he began to panic. The bottle was labeled with a woman’s name and the name of a drug that did not sound like what the doctor had prescribed for him. The bottom line was that the pharmacy had inadvertently switched the filled prescription bottles of two patients and simply placed them in wrong bags.

As easily and innocently as this error occurred, it could have been much more injurious or even lethal. Unfortunately, pharmacists are humans like the rest of us. Medication errors occur more often than we may realize with the increasingly heavy workloads of pharmacy staff and by the endless distractions that occur behind the prescription counters these days.

An additional complication includes the countless new generic medication substitutions for branded drugs. I believe that most generic medications are wonderful, less expensive alternatives to the expensive brand-named drugs, but at times a pharmacy will switch generic brands when procuring mediations from a different supplier. As a patient taking a couple of regular medications, that has happened to me before. I open a new prescription bottle and the pill looks different than the last time I had it filled. Do I trust that this is the right drug and just a different generic of what I was previously taking, or do I question it?

Although I believe pharmacists and their support staff are among some of the most careful healthcare providers around, medication errors of one kind or another will occur occasionally. The good news for patients is that there are some simple steps that one can take to be sure that you leave the pharmacy with the correct medication.

  • If it is a new medication, the pharmacy staff are obligated to ask if you have questions about the drug or want advice on how to take it. That’s the perfect opportunity to say, “Yes, I’d like to speak to the pharmacist.” That’s the perfect time to confirm that your doctor prescribed a drug for your specific ailment and that drug indeed is the usual dose for your medical situation.
  • If you are taking a medication on a regular basis, always check the contents of the prescription bottle BEFORE leaving the pharmacy check-out counter to confirm that the drug looks like what you were taking before. If not, question the pharmacy staff to make sure it is the correct medication and only a different generic brand of the same drug. The pharmacy staff should be indicating that to you when they switch generic brands (which is totally appropriate most of the time), but you should confirm that that’s the reason the pill or capsule looks different.
  • And, based on the experience of the patient above, I think it’s a good idea before you complete the purchase of any prescription, to look at the bag containing your prescription to make sure that it is indeed labeled for you, and break open the bag to check the prescription bottle to make sure that it is your prescription with your name on the label.

The pharmaceutical industry from manufacturer to dispensing pharmacy has amazing automated safeguards in place to assure accuracy of medication and dosing all along the pharmacy distribution chain. However, those systems do involve human interactions at various points along the process, and unfortunately even the most educated and conscientious of humans are liable to make mistakes. Take steps to prevent that human element from turning into a personal, lethal liability.

Thoughts? Comments? I’d love to hear them!

Posted in About James J. Murray, Blog Writers, Blogging, Drug Error Prevention, Drug Misadventures, Generic Drug Safety, Generic vs Brand Name Drugs, James J. Murray Blog, Medication Safety Issues, New Blog, Pharmacist Errors, Pharmacy Dispensing Errors, Pharmacy/Pharmaceuticals, Prescription Errors, Prescription For Murder Blog, The Pharmacy Profession | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How To Write a Bloodless Death Scene

The storylines of the novels I write often call for one or more of the characters to be murdered. That’s simple enough when you write murder mysteries—you shoot or stab the person, or use a dozen other ways to kill off the character!

Since my writing theme is MURDER, MAYHEM and MEDICINE, however, most of the lethal methods I use involve drugs, poisons or other chemicals. In fact, my current work in process is titled The Serial Chemist—no other explanation needed.

There was a plot I once used where it was important that the killer not leave ANY blood at the crime scene, ESPECIALLY the victim’s! So, the question I had to answer before writing was, “What method do I use to accomplish that?”

My research led me to some interesting ideas on how to construct bloodless murder scenes, and I’d like to share a few of those with you in case you have such plot ideas in mind for your next novel or short story.

The following is a list of the more interesting and believable ways to accomplish this task:

The Temple Blow – The skull is thin there and the temple bone shatters easily. More importantly, the middle meningeal artery is located there. Rupture that and it causes a build-up of blood and brain compression—and this is known as an epidural hemorrhage. Death will follow if the pressure from the blood is not relieved in a relatively short amount of time.

The Russian Omelet – Cross the legs of the victim and pin him or her to the ground chest down. Push the legs up toward the person’s back and sit on them to fold and break the base of the spine. It’s usually fatal. The killer, however, should be of “substantial” weight to make this a believable kill method.

An Airborne Toxin Release – There are any number of good choices, from a viral toxin to a lethal poison. A simple Internet search will fuel the imagination, or you can scan some of my previous blogs since I’ve written numerous ones over the years on those subjects.

An Insulin Overdose – Insulin is the hormone secreted from the pancreas whenever sugary or starchy foods are consumed. Insulin transports blood glucose into the body’s cells so they can be used as fuel. Too much insulin, however, causes low blood sugar and can lead to a variety of symptoms (shaking, sweating, blurred vision, seizures and coma) before certain death. Describe the symptoms properly and you’ve got a great murder scene.

Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning – It’s a simple way to kill, but not very imaginative. Lock someone in a garage with a car running and soon the carbon monoxide build-up will kill because it replaces the oxygen in blood.

Toxins That React with Blood to Replace Oxygen – There are other products on the market that kill in the same way as CO. In a murder scene that I wrote for one of my novels, I used the strong fumes of an organic solvent (a paint remover) that preferentially bonded to hemoglobin instead of oxygen. It proved to me once again that there’s no substitute for good research when writing creative, interesting murder scenes with unique murder weapons.

Ethylene Glycol – This is the main component of antifreeze. It’s colorless, odorless, sweet tasting and is easy to add to most any food or drink. It rapidly absorbs in the GI tract and distributes throughout the body, creating a variety of toxic effects. The initial symptoms mimic a drunken state, but kidney failure usually causes death. Interestingly, alcohol is the antidote of choice. Maybe the KILLER should down a shot of whiskey to celebrate a good kill!

Strangulation – A dramatic death for sure, but it’s been used A LOT. It causes death in one of two ways: compression of the carotid arteries and/or the jugular veins, and this deprives the brain of oxygen. It can also fatally compress the larynx and/or trachea to prevent air intake to suffocate the victim.

A Fatal Drug Dose – Any number of drugs (both legal and illegal) could be used, but the most rapid effects are gained if the drug is injected. I’ve blogged in the past about what drug makes the perfect murder weapon. I’ve also blogged in the past on a few other potentially lethal drugs, and I’ll certainly introduce more in future blogs.

The Adam’s Apple Crush – This is a hit to the larynx and a prime strike point to cause death if the attacker connects dead center and with substantial force. It makes a great kill scene for those attackers with a martial arts background. The knuckle punch or a strategic kick closes the airway and denies the ability to draw in air. Oxygen deprivation results in death.

These are just a few of the more interesting bloodless murder methods to add to your crime research. I’m sure you’ve come across others. Want to share them with us?

Thoughts? Comments? I’d love to hear them!

Posted in A How To Blog on Murder Plot Ideas, A How To Blog on Murder Weapons, A Writer's Psyche, About James J. Murray, About Medications/Pharmacy, About Murder, About Writing, Accuracy in Writing, Achieving Writing Perfection, All About Murder, All About Writing, Blog Writers, Blogging, Bloodless Death Scene Writing, Bloodless Death Scenes, Characteristics of Killing, Characteristics of Murder, Chemicals Used For Murder, Deciding How to Kill Off a Character in a Novel, Designer Poisons Used For Murder, Designing Murder Plots, Developing Better Writing Skills, Developing Story Plots, Developing Storyline Ideas, Developing Writing Skills, Drugs For Murder Plots, Evidence Free Murder, Fiction Based on Facts, Fiction Writing - A Believable Lie, How to Choose a Murder Weapon for a Plot Idea, How To Write A BloodLess Murder Scene, Ideas for Murder Scenes, Instruments of Death, Interesting Murder Weapons, James J. Murray Blog, Killing a Villain in a Novel, Killing Off Characters in Writing, Killing Off Characters in Your Novel, Learning the Art of Writing, Lethal Chemicals in Murder Mysteries, Murder Mayhem and Medicine, Murder With Drugs, Murder without Evidence of Foul Play, New Blog, New Methods of Murder, New Methods To Kill Characters in Your Novel, Plot Development, Plotting Interesting Murder Scenes, Prescription For Murder Blog, Story Development, The Art of Storytelling, The Art of Writing, the perfect crime, the perfect murder, the perfect murder weapon, The Psychology of Murder, The Science of Murder, Tools of Murder, Ways To Kill, Ways to Murder, Writing Death Scenes, Writing Dramatic Murder Scenes | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Flu Prevention Without the Shot

Each year my wife and I trek over to our local pharmacy to get our flu shots before the winter season hits. I’m not needle-adverse, but it’s not a thrilling experience. I would rather have an alternate method of delivery for this annual vaccine. There was a nasal spray flu vaccine introduced in the recent past, but that has proven to be less effective against certain strains of influenza.

I’ve blogged before about various vaccines being tested for administration via a disposable patch, but imagine my delight when I read an article the other day about a flu vaccine administered via a sticker patch. Fantasy you say? Not so, say the experts!

A small clinical trial that involved a hundred volunteers showed that this vaccine patch successfully immunized the users against the flu. It was relatively painless compared to a shot and produced few side effects.

This new, revolutionary technology involves a skin patch with a hundred, tiny hair-like microneedles impregnated with the vaccine attached to the adhesive side of a skin patch. Regular vaccine injections go all the way through the muscle, but the hair-like microneedles with the vaccine material only puncture into the upper layer of skin. The vaccine dose is delivered in about 20 minutes and the microneedles dissolve away.

So, alongside do-it-yourself, at-home diagnostic tests, we now can add a do-it-yourself, at-home flu vaccine dosing. Its application is as simple as putting on a sticker patch for less than a half hour, peeling it off after that and throwing it into the trash.

I could imagine the whole process of flu shots being replaced by a vaccine ordered by my doctor, having it automatically sent to my home each year (since this new delivery system requires no prior refrigeration) and me administering the dose myself.

The implications for this new vaccine dosing are astounding. First, children might even look forward to a yearly super hero sticker that they could wear on their skin like a badge of honor and be immunized at the same time.

Additionally, the convenience of no refrigeration not only allows for mail order of this medication in developed countries, but it also facilitates use in third world countries where conventional vaccination is not an option due to lack of electricity and refrigeration.

When the patch gets approval for use in the next couple of years, administering flu or other vaccines could be as easy as putting on a Band-Aid.

Thoughts? Comments? I’d love to hear them!

Posted in About James J. Murray, About Medications/Pharmacy, Blog Writers, Blogging, Curing Viral Infections, Curing Virus Infections, Cutting Edge Medical Research On Virus Cures, Deadly Viruses, Flu Shot Technology, James J. Murray Blog, Lethal Virus Cure Research, Mail Order Flu Vaccines, Methods to Deliver Vaccines, Murder Mayhem and Medicine, New Blog, New Developments in Vaccine Therapy, New Drug Discoveries, New Drug Manufacturing Methods, New Drug Research, New Flu Shot Idea, New Method to Administer Flu Vaccine, New Research Technology, Pharmacy/Pharmaceuticals, Prescription For Murder Blog, Vaccine Patches, Viral Epidemics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Happy Fourth of July!

HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY!!

My wish is for you and your family to enjoy

this wonderful summer holiday and to have a safe

Fourth of July celebration experience.

Posted in A Holiday Wish, Fourth of July, Fourth of July Celebrating, Happy Fourth of July, Holiday Cheer | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Committing the Perfect Crime!

I’m in the process of writing the second book in my Detective Rosie Young Murder Mystery Series. This one is called The Serial Chemist. The first in the series, Almost Dead, was a great success with a 4.8 out of a 5.0-star rating on Amazon. Click here to read a synopsis or to check out the reviews.

In developing the plot for this new book, I wanted to create an especially difficult case for Detective Young and her partner, Vince Mendez. To do that, I researched websites for tips on how to commit the perfect murder. Fortunately for me as a murder mystery writer, there is much information on the subject, but I found some interesting, yet disturbing, data regarding the clearance rate of modern murders.

A disturbing statistic is that about a third of the murders committed in the United States remain unsolved. Fifty years ago, the clearance rate was over 90% compared to the present-day rate of only 64.1%. Note that the term “clearance rate” does not equal the conviction rate. “Clearing the case” refers to the fact that the investigation resulted in an arrest that went to trial. Since the 1960’s, over 200,000 murders remain unsolved with no arrests.

So, back to my research on committing the perfect murder! What should a writer consider if he or she intends to plot the perfect (unsolvable) murder? The top five considerations to commit the perfect murder are as follows:

  • Don’t leave any DNA behind. Tracing DNA to the suspect is the surest way to prove that someone committed a crime, particularly if the DNA is linked to the murder weapon or other very specific incriminating object. The most untraceable crimes are committed in public places—like parks or shopping malls—where lots of different DNA are present.
  • Pick a random victim. The easiest murders to solve are those committed by someone close to the victim. A relative, friend, or significant other are always among the first to be considered by the authorities.
  • Commit a murder in a different locality than where the murderer lives. The villain should not travel so far as to leave evidence of a trip (such as an airline or hotel reservation) that links to the crime scene, but committing a crime in one’s own locality also often produces connections that make a case easier to solve.
  • Don’t allow the villain to be conspicuous. While the general rule is to time a murder in the very early hours of the day when most witnesses are asleep, your murderer should not look out of place on a street or other setting near the crime scene at any time or even be recognized acquiring the murder weapon; and, the murderer should not use a murder weapon that can link the crime back to him or her in any way. Use an unusual weapon that the murderer is not familiar with (common brands only) and the villain should purchase that weapon away from a familiar local.
  • Plan an appropriate alibi and getaway. Be sure that the murderer can be connected to an event or to other people at the approximate time of the crime (time of death can usually only be approximate) and make sure your villain uses a method to escape the crime scene that does not provide a definitive description. An easily identifiable vehicle that has a distinct sound, such as a throaty sports car engine, would be something that sticks in the mind of a witness. I’ve read that a bicycle makes an excellent getaway vehicle. It’s not easily identifiable as different from other bikes and it’s relatively silent.

Finally, if your villain commits the perfect crime, you can still enhance the plot by writing in an arrest of your murderer. Remember, when a case goes to trial, the suspect needs to be found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Witnesses are discredited all the time on the witness stand by defense attorneys, and prosecutors often try cases only when the police can deliver “open and shut” cases that will lead to convictions or a plea bargain.

Thoughts? Comments? I’d love to hear them!

Posted in A How To Blog on Murder Plot Ideas, A How To Blog on Murder Weapons, A Murder Mystery Novel, A Mystery Novel, About James J. Murray, About Murder, Accuracy in Writing, Achieving Writing Perfection, All About Murder, All About Writing, Almost Dead, Almost Dead-The Novel, Better Fiction Writing, Blog Writers, Blogging, Characteristics of Killing, Characteristics of Murder, Committing The Perfect Murder, Connecting With Your Reader, Creating Emotional Drama in a Murder Scene, Deciding How to Kill Off a Character in a Novel, Designing Murder Plots, Developing Better Writing Skills, Developing Story Plots, Developing Storyline Ideas, Developing Writing Skills, Evidence Free Murder, Fiction Based on Real Life, Fiction Writing - A Believable Lie, How to Choose a Murder Weapon for a Plot Idea, Ideas for Murder Scenes, James J. Murray Blog, James J. Murray's ALMOST DEAD, Killing Off Characters in Writing, Killing Off Characters in Your Novel, Methods of Murder, Murder Mayhem and Medicine, Murder Mystery Novel, Murder Weapons Discussed, New Blog, New Methods of Murder, New Methods To Kill Characters in Your Novel, Plotting Interesting Murder Scenes, Plotting The Perfect Murder, Prescription For Murder Blog, The Art of Storytelling, The Art of Writing, the perfect crime, the perfect murder, the perfect murder weapon, The Science of Murder, The Writings of James J. Murray, Tools of Fiction Writing, Tools of Murder, Unique Murder Plots, Writing Death Scenes, Writing Dramatic Murder Scenes, Writing Skills, Writing Techniques | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Changing Ordinary People into Heroes!

In last week’s blog, I discussed fiction novel character development techniques. I ended the blog by stating, “Make your characters real and believable by first making them real to you.”

An evolving fiction plot is not very interesting unless there is conflict and some sort of change in your protagonist by the end of the story. It could be the resolution of a world-changing event in a thriller, finding the killer in a murder mystery, or some major change in your main character’s world or their specific world view that makes the story interesting.

The problem arises when an author attempts to make a character believable by making an ordinary character do extraordinary (heroic) things. How does the writer make such fiction believable?

The main character in my most recent novel is simply a guy with a troubled past trying to do the right thing. The problem is the bad guys keep getting in the way of my protagonist’s normal life. My protagonist has two choices: ignore a world-changing event and hide his head in the sand, or step up to right the wrongs.

My task as a writer is to take this character who craves a normal existence and place him in situations that challenge his entire idea of what a normal life should be and force him to make choices he’d rather not make. My protagonist is a successful pharmacist who owns a very specialized pharmacy practice; and, in the last two novels, he’s turned his back on his everyday world to fight villains and avert sinister events that could have global consequences.

How does a writer make that monumental leap, and successfully take the reader along, in a journey to evolve this everyday guy into a hero, and still make it believable?

The answer lies in how the first act of the novel is handled—how one builds a character’s world in the first 25% of the novel by drizzling in enough history about a protagonist’s life so that an advanced or second level of background on this character is achieved. This is how a normal character’s heroics come off as believable.

In last week’s blog, I stated that I develop characters by using a 3P Model: building on the physical aspects of a character, and including some important psychological aspects and specific philosophies of the character.

Regarding advanced character development, the writer must focus on specific traits and skills that the character might possess, but that aren’t often visible, to meet the challenges that the writer presents for that character.

These traits and skills might include:

  • Specific past traumas (both physical and psychological) that create specialized motivations to act out of the ordinary in certain situations. For instance, an adult abused as a child will react differently to seeing a child being yanked roughly by the arm than a person who grew up in a loving, caring family.
  • If your character has hidden skills developed in a previous job or an earlier environment, those skills are never forgotten or lost and can re-emerge as necessary when the character is confronted with a life-threatening event.
  • Hidden secrets can fester over time and force a character to react differently to tragic events. Creating an abnormal past for your protagonist allows secrets that should remain hidden to evolve into heroic actions when a character is confronted with saving his or her own life, or the life of a loved one.
  • Specific, deep-seated feelings can often explain why an outwardly normal person might act in an extraordinary way regarding a tragic event.

I delight in writing fiction and in creating situations for my protagonist that goes beyond the limits of his everyday world and forces him to act in extraordinary ways. To do that in a believable fashion, I must first load the character’s background with secret histories, hidden skills and past experiences that the everyday person has never been exposed to.

Thoughts? Comments? I’d love to hear them!

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Fictional Character Development 101

As many of you know, I’ve recently published my third novel. Click HERE to Review or Buy! While deep in the process of promoting that book, I can’t help but look to the future and begin another one.

In last week’s blog, I spoke about what to do after publishing a book and how to fill that void. My best answer was to start another book—and I have. As I pulled out my storyboard (yes, an old school dry erase board – Lol), the first thing I did was construct the main characters for this next novel. To do that, I reread a couple of my old blogs that addressed character development.

One of those blogs particularly gave me focus and direction to create what I think will be a totally different, unique character never seen before in my writing. I found this blog so useful that I decided to share it with you today.

The following is a repost of that blog from more than two years ago. I hope it provides some insight into creating a character or two for one of your future stories.

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While it’s true that I often base a character on real people, transforming a mental image of someone into a fictional character is an intricate process. It’s comparable to applying multiple layers of varnish onto raw wood. You apply, buff, reapply, rebuff and continue the process until the wood develops depth and beauty.

Character development, in similar ways, layers all the components of a person in order to build a multi-dimensional being that the reader can connect with in the two-dimensional world of literature.

In the process of developing a character, I follow something called a 3P Model. I structure a character physiologically, psychologically and philosophically.

The Physical Aspects of a Character: You should have a good idea what your character looks like before conveying that to a reader. Physical appearance should first be locked down in your own mind. Even if you never specifically describe that character’s anatomical features in your writing, you should visualize a definite image.

Appearances often influence how others act. Hints of physical attributes give the reader much needed information to arrive at an accurate mental image. These images allow your readers to feel comfortable about how your characters act and how they interact with others in your story.

But a seasoned writer rarely goes into detail describing a character. Instead of saying, “She’s five foot eleven, has red hair and weighs 110-lbs,” you might say, “Her legs went on forever, her waistline the envy of most women, her flaming hair a perfect complement to her peaches and cream complexion,” or some other subtle, more pictorial description. Be creative, not biological, when describing characters.

The Psychology of the Character: Characters’ mental states—their feelings and their perceptions of the world around them—drive their actions. This is where background development becomes so important. Create a virtual life for your main characters, a pedigree that makes them who they are and which determines their actions. For example, a person raised in a loving family with close siblings would react differently in a given situation than a person who grew up in foster care or reform school.

It’s said that we are the product of our life experiences. For readers to be able to connect with the characters we create, we must construct full lives for our characters. That means we should know where and how they were raised, educated and what sacrifices they endured to reach their present state in life. Most of what you envision (preferably in a brief outline) will never actually be stated in your book unless it’s important for the story’s progress, but it provides valuable information to direct your character and further the story.

Knowing how a character would feel in a scene provides important visual clues that you can use to indicate what a character is thinking and feeling without wasting dialogue. For instance, a character fidgeting indicates nervousness and putting a hand over the mouth could express disbelief.

The reader should be satisfied that a character acts appropriately in any given scene. Your job as a writer is not only to write the scene but also to direct your characters to act accordingly. A reader should never say, “Hmm, he would never have done that!” It takes the reader out of the story and you lose the reader’s emotional connection to the character.

The Character’s Philosophy: Each of us has opinions and beliefs about most any given subject. Our characters should also be definitive, and those distinct beliefs and philosophies are what drive the story one way or another. An indifferent character doesn’t make for good storytelling.

A character can be indecisive initially and that can create important dramatic tension, but at some point their inner principles must take over. Without a character with strong viewpoints, there’s no reason for the character to take action—and that translates to NO STORY! Action moves a story forward and motivates our protagonists and antagonists to do what they should do to entertain the reader.

Characters can be good or bad, but rarely should they be neutral. Definitive characters create and drive your story. A villain’s selfishness and greed make good fiction as well as the altruistic concerns of a hero, but neutral characters lose the reader’s interest.

Finally, success is in the details. A well-conceived character has likes, dislikes, and specific needs—just as real people do. Everyone has merits, flaws and quirks. Your dialogue and narrative should be peppered with those of your main characters. The more these individual traits are exposed, the more emotional connection the reader has with a character. Make your characters real and believable by first making them real to you.

Thoughts? Comments? I’d love to hear them!

Posted in A Jon Masters Novel, A New Novel By James J. Murray, A Thriller Novel, About James J. Murray, About Writing, Accuracy in Writing, All About Writing, Better Fiction Writing, Better Fictional Character Development, Blog Writers, Blogging, Character development, Character Development Techniques, Characteristics of a Fictional Character, Counterfeit Drugs and the Internet, Creating Interesting Fiction Characters, Creating Unique and Interesting Character Flaws, Developing Better Writing Skills, Developing Effective and Compelling Fictional Heroes, Developing Story Plots, Developing Storyline Ideas, Developing Writing Skills, Fiction Writing - A Believable Lie, Fictional Character Development, Growing As A Writer, Ideas for Creating Permanent Change, Imperfect Murder The Novel, James J. Murray Blog, James J. Murray's IMPERFECT MURDER Novel, Learning the Art of Writing, Murder Mayhem and Medicine, New Blog, New Thriller, New Thriller To Download, Pharmacists as Protagonists, Proper Use of the Written Word, Protagonist Development, Published Novel by James J Murray, Publishing A Novel, Steps to Developing Great Fictional Characters, The Art of Storytelling, The Art of Writing, The Writings of James J. Murray, Writing Skills, Writing Techniques | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments